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Advice provision

This category contains 7 posts

Researching users’ perspectives – report from a UKAJI workshop

On 26 January 2017, UKAJI hosted an interactive workshop on researching the perspectives of users of administrative justice. Below are a summary of the event and links to papers and presentations. Background Understanding ‘users’ perspectives’ is one of the most sought-after aspects within administrative justice and also one of the most complex to research and … Continue reading

International workshop on measuring effective access to justice – an overview

  The following overview sets out a summary of a recent workshop on access to justice hosted by the Open Society Justice Initiative (OSJI) and Organisation of Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). It was held in Paris, at the OECD Conference Centre, on 3-4 November 2016. By Cris Coxon About the workshop The Open Society … Continue reading

Administrative justice in Wales – legacy report and the way forward

By Ray Burningham In August this year the Welsh Government published the legacy report of the Committee for Administrative Justice and Tribunals Wales (CAJTW), whose life came to an end in March 2016 after two years of work. The report was informed by the Committee’s own work and by a research project commissioned by the … Continue reading

Conference announcement – Litigating for social change

Litigating for Social Change Wednesday 19 – Friday 21 October 2016 Belfast, Northern Ireland This international conference will bring together NGOs, community activists, litigators, academics and funders to reflect on how strategic litigation can transform lives and enable people and communities to realise their rights. The conference will explore: lessons learnt to date how strategic … Continue reading

Revisiting valuable research: Economic value of social welfare advice makes compelling investment case

‘While there is a voluminous literature on the social value of legal aid, there is a dearth of evidence on its economic value, and what exists is predominantly from the US. Despite concerns over the quality of the data and methodologies adopted, all of the studies reviewed concluded that legal aid not only pays for … Continue reading