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Complaints

This category contains 18 posts

Administrative justice oversight must continue

This week sees the final meeting of the Administrative Justice Forum, which was established following the abolition of the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council in 2013. The AJTC was abolished following a government consultation and an inquiry by the then Public Administration Select Committee. UKAJI takes this opportunity to set out some proposals for the … Continue reading

An initial commentary on the draft public services ombuds bill

On 5 December 2016, the Cabinet Office published the draft Public Service Ombudsman Bill, setting out its proposals for bringing together the responsibilities of the current Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman and the Local Government Ombudsman to create a new organisation with strengthened governance and accountability for complaints about public services in England. The Bill has had a long gestation, … Continue reading

Consumer justice in the dock as legal system juggles competing schemes

Are the EU ADR Directive and the proposals for an online court likely to work together to bring in an era of greater access to justice for those with low-value disputes? Or are they parallel initiatives that expose a gap? Pablo Cortes has been researching, from a socio-legal perspective, the main consumer ADR schemes operating in … Continue reading

Journey to Nowhere: The ADR Directive, airline complaints and the Civil Aviation Authority

New requirements for service providers to signpost consumers to independent redress have been in force in the UK since October 2015. This post examines the effectiveness of the UK’s implementation of the EU ADR Directive in light of the practicalities of regulation and the accreditation of redress providers, focusing on compliance by the airline industry … Continue reading

Seminar on initial decision-making, internal review and administrative justice

Mandatory reconsideration is something of a hybrid feature of administrative justice. In terms of design, this is obvious. It is a form of redress in one sense, but it is also a form of primary decision-making in another. By Robert Thomas and Joseph Tomlinson, School of Law, University of Manchester We recently held a joint UKAJI/University … Continue reading