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Human rights/equalities

This category contains 62 posts

Universal Credit – When evidence becomes politicised

In our Research Roadmap published in February of this year, UKAJI cited the roll-out of Universal Credit (UC) as an example of the extraordinary impact of administrative justice on the day-to-day lives of people. In this blog post, we consider the recent report by the National Audit Office (NAO) on its independent review of UC, … Continue reading

Grenfell – an administrative justice case study, one year on

This week is the one-year anniversary of the fire at Grenfell Tower. The fire led to the deaths of 72 people; it has been called a tragedy and a preventable mass fatality, both terms implying different degrees of accountability of public bodies. We have learned much over the past year about the causes of the … Continue reading

Windrush – what are the administrative justice dimensions?

‘You would be surprised how often the just society, the good life, human happiness, call it what you will, is pushed out of our reach, not by the malevolence of some people, usually referred to as ” they,” who are consciously depriving us of it, or by the inertia of those to whom we entrust … Continue reading

A reflection on the participation of decision-makers in administrative justice research

By Michelle Waite Decisions made by those working in administrative justice systems are often in the news, especially in the context of sickness and disability benefits. In a recent Twitter exchange I expressed the view that in order to fully understand any administrative justice system it is essential that decision-makers are included in administrative justice … Continue reading

What do we know about the role of young people in SEND dispute resolution? A research overview: Part 1

By Margaret Doyle This post is in two parts: Part 1, published here, sets out what we know from research about young people’s involvement in special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) dispute resolution; Part 2 explores what we know about involving young people with SEN in research. The two-part post forms part of a knowledge-exchange project, … Continue reading