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Human rights/equalities

This category contains 117 posts

Mandatory Orders and the enforcement of public law duties: R (Imam) v Croydon LBC

Mandatory Orders and the enforcement of public law duties: R (Imam) v Croydon LBC By Gabriel Tan In public law, the imposition of a duty on a public body means that the body must act in a particular way, or secure a particular outcome. Where these duties are not fulfilled, the most direct and effective … Continue reading

Debating judicial power after the Independent Review of Administrative Law

Debating judicial power after the Independent Review of Administrative Law By Gabriel Tan On 18th March, the Cambridge Union hosted their Final Debate of Lent 2021 on the motion: ‘This House Believes Judges Make Better Law Than Politicians’, with two former Supreme Court Justices, Lord Sumption and Lord Neuberger, speaking on opposite sides of the … Continue reading

Vaccination: Where the state meets the street

Vaccination: Where the state meets the street By Margaret Doyle (University of Essex) Since April last year, I’ve been supporting a woman who lives nearby, whom I’ll call Deirdre, delivering her newspapers, doing a bit of shopping, and liaising with the Council over housing matters on her behalf. I see her every day, but Deirdre … Continue reading

Report Proposes New Legal Powers for the Victims’ Commissioner

Report Proposes New Legal Powers for the Victims’ Commissioner By Maurce Sunkin (University of Essex), Pam Cox (University of Essex) and Ruth Lamont (University of Manchester). This post first appeared on the Essex Law Research Blog here and is reposted with thanks and permission. The role of the Victims’ Commissioner for England and Wales – … Continue reading

(Lacking in) Methodological Rigour, Human Rights and Devolution: IRAL’s challenge is one of process as well as substance

(Lacking in) Methodological Rigour, Human Rights and Devolution: IRAL’s challenge is one of process as well as substance By Katie Boyle and Diana Camps (University of Stirling) The Independent Review of Administrative Law (IRAL) manifests as an example of methodological research practice that is inherently flawed from the outset. We argue here that the review … Continue reading