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Initial decision-making

This category contains 21 posts

New research: Rule of law and access to justice concerns in immigration detention

  New research uses the concepts of the rule of law and access to justice to investigate the situation of people in immigration detention in the UK. Each year some 30,000 people with immigration status issues spend varying lengths of time in the nine dedicated ‘Immigration Removal Centres’ around the country. The UK, which has … Continue reading

New journal article published: Mapping current issues in administrative justice: austerity and the ‘more bureaucratic rationality’ approach

By Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson We have published a new paper in the Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law entitled “Mapping current issues in administrative justice: austerity and the ‘more bureaucratic rationality’ approach”. The paper draws upon our ESRC-funded policy seminar on administrative justice decisions, reviews, and appeals. The abstract of the paper is … Continue reading

Immigration administrative review: the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration’s second report

By Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson The Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration (ICIBI) recently published his second report on the Home Office’s administrative review process. This blog provides some context for this report and also analyses its contents.  The new immigration administrative review process In recent years, government has reformed administrative redress processes. … Continue reading

Algorithmic decision-making and human rights

By Vivian Ng ‘Man Vs. Machine’. ‘How algorithms rule the world’. ‘How algorithms rule our working lives’. ‘How Machines Learn to be Racist’. ‘Is an algorithm any less racist than a human?’ ‘Machine Bias’. ‘Weapons of Math Destruction’. ‘Code-Dependent’. These are some of the recent headlines about the age of artificial intelligence, that seem to […] … Continue reading

A Design Problem for Judicial Review: What we know and what we need to know about immigration judicial reviews

By Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson Immigration and asylum claimants often use judicial review to challenge immigration refusal decisions made by the Home Office. Immigration-related cases have, for a long time now, presented serious difficulties to the efficient management of the judicial review system in the UK. The transfer of judicial reviews to the Upper … Continue reading