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UK Administrative Justice Institute

Funded by the Nuffield Foundation, we link research, practice & policy on administrative justice in the UK
UK Administrative Justice Institute has written 63 posts for UKAJI

Book review: Research Handbook on the Ombudsman (Hertogh & Kirkham, 2018).

Research Handbook on The Ombudsman, Marc Hertogh and Richard Kirkham (eds) (Elgar 2018) ISBN 978 1 78643 124 0 (cased) 978 1 78643 125 7 (eBook), pp 536 plus i-xiii.   By Maurice Sunkin (University of Essex)   This volume is one of a series of research handbooks that seeks to provide state – of … Continue reading

UKAJI July 2019 round-up

Here is UKAJI’s round-up of important administrative justice news and events for July 2019. If you have anything to add to this month’s round-up or any future round-ups, please contact Lee Marsons on lm17598@essex.ac.uk.   UKAJI blog posts: Rosa Morris (Independent Researcher), Michael Orton (University of Warwick), and Kate Summers (LSE) posted a blog entitled … Continue reading

How Immigration Judicial Review Works

How immigration judicial review works    Robert Thomas (R) and Joe Tomlinson (L)      Two years ago on this blog, we drew attention to the immigration judicial review system—by far the most active area of judicial review litigation and the vast majority of all judicial reviews in England and Wales. In that post, we … Continue reading

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.   By Sarah Craig (University of Glasgow)   Providing an interpreter addresses individuals’ access to justice rights, and it also promotes accountable decisions, based on appropriately translated information.[i]  But interpreting in justice settings is not straightforward, and digitalisation adds … Continue reading

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme   Joe Tomlinson     In the fraught context of Brexit, the need to register EU citizens already resident in the UK presented a major conundrum of policy, law, and administration. The answer that has been offered by the government is the … Continue reading