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Tribunals

This category contains 75 posts

Reform of the administrative justice system: a plea for change and a research agenda

Reform of the administrative justice system: a plea for change and a research agenda   By Richard Kirkham (University of Sheffield) (L) and Naomi Creutzfeldt (University of Westminster) (R)       This post is a response to recent overlapping speeches given by the Senior President of Tribunals (SPT), Sir Ernest Ryder, with a particular … Continue reading

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.   By Sarah Craig (University of Glasgow)   Providing an interpreter addresses individuals’ access to justice rights, and it also promotes accountable decisions, based on appropriately translated information.[i]  But interpreting in justice settings is not straightforward, and digitalisation adds … Continue reading

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme   Joe Tomlinson     In the fraught context of Brexit, the need to register EU citizens already resident in the UK presented a major conundrum of policy, law, and administration. The answer that has been offered by the government is the … Continue reading

“Hello Dungavel!”: observations on the use of video link technology in immigration bail hearings

“Hello Dungavel!”: observations on the use of video link technology in immigration bail hearings   By Jo Hynes   Immigration bail hearings are by nature unspectacular. They are short, take place in chaotic hearing centres, and have fewer immediate consequences than other hearings in the First Tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber). Still, they offer … Continue reading

Book review: Responsive Legality: The New Administrative Justice

By Naomi Creutzfeldt In this blog post, Naomi Creutzfeldt reviews a new book by Zach Richards, Responsive Legality: The New Administrative Justice (Routledge 2019). In his recent book, Zach Richards presents a theory of administrative justice for the 21st century: responsive legality. He argues that ‘responsive legality is the new justifying logic of twenty-first-century administrative … Continue reading