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Appeals

This category contains 49 posts

Windrush – what are the administrative justice dimensions?

‘You would be surprised how often the just society, the good life, human happiness, call it what you will, is pushed out of our reach, not by the malevolence of some people, usually referred to as ” they,” who are consciously depriving us of it, or by the inertia of those to whom we entrust … Continue reading

What do we know about the role of young people in SEND dispute resolution? A research overview: Part 2

By Margaret Doyle This post is in two parts: Part 1 set out what we know from research about young people’s involvement in special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) dispute resolution; Part 2, published here, explores what we know about involving young people with SEN in research, what guidance would look like for mediators, and what … Continue reading

New Report: The Digitalisation of Tribunals

Tribunals are a major part of the administrative justice system. The Government has begun to introduce digital procedures in tribunals but the full details of the changes remain to be seen. This report—commissioned by the UK Administrative Justice Institute—outlines ‘what we know and what we need to know’ about the digitalisation of tribunals. It takes … Continue reading

What do we know about the role of young people in SEND dispute resolution? A research overview: Part 1

By Margaret Doyle This post is in two parts: Part 1, published here, sets out what we know from research about young people’s involvement in special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) dispute resolution; Part 2 explores what we know about involving young people with SEN in research. The two-part post forms part of a knowledge-exchange project, … Continue reading

Mental Health Tribunals: Examining current practice, rising caseloads and next steps

  By Nicola Glover-Thomas This report results from a one-day policy seminar in December 2017, Mental Health Tribunals: Evaluating Current Practice and Moving Forward, funded by the University of Manchester and The UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI). The seminar was part of a project sponsored by UKAJI and HM Courts and Tribunals Service to explore … Continue reading