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This category contains 21 posts

What’s new in administrative justice, November 2016

UK Parliament The Investigatory Powers Bill has entered its final stage and is now ping ponging between the Lords and the Commons. The Commons accepted the majority of the Lords amendments, which were tabled by the Government and were aimed at adding or strengthening safeguards. The Commons rejected amendments tabled by Baroness Hollins, with cross … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, October 2016

Parliament The Public Accounts Committee has published a report on the Ministry of Justice’s reforms to the probation system, aimed at reducing reoffending. The report expressed concerns about a lack of progress with the reforms. The new Secretary of State for Justice Liz Truss has given evidence to the Justice Committee. She confirmed that the … Continue reading

Tribunal Statistics, April to June 2016

By Robert Thomas The Ministry of Justice recently released the tribunal statistics for April-June 2016. This note highlights some of the principal points of interest from the statistics. Social security There are two points to highlight from the statistics on social security appeals. First, there is the high success rates of appeals concerning two of … Continue reading

Mandatory reconsideration: what do the latest stats tell us?

By Robert Thomas Readers of this blog will be well-aware of mandatory reconsideration (MR) and the discussion surrounding it. More than half a million MR decisions have been made since the introduction of MR in 2013, making this one of the largest areas of administrative decision-making. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) recently published … Continue reading

Allowed appeals and initial decision-making

Robert Thomas, School of Law, University of Manchester  This blog post investigates the number of appeals allowed by tribunals and the reasons for this.   How many appeals are allowed by tribunals? And why do tribunals allow appeals? To start with, here is some data. Figure 1 shows the proportion of allowed appeals concerning social … Continue reading