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Statistics

This category contains 23 posts

What’s new in administrative justice, May 2017

UK Parliament Parliament was dissolved on 3 May prior to the General Election on 8 June. A number of Bills received Royal Assent before dissolution, including the Criminal Finances Bill and the Digital Economy Bill. The JCHR has published an interim report calling on the Government to bring forward legislation in the next Parliament to … Continue reading

Immigration appeals and delays: On the verge of a crisis?

By Robert Thomas In this blog Robert Thomas considers delays in immigration appeals and available data. There have been some news stories over recent months about delays in immigration appeals. In December 2016, Meg Hillier MP, chair of the Commons Public Accounts Committee, said that the immigration appeals system was on the verge of a … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, November 2016

UK Parliament The Investigatory Powers Bill has entered its final stage and is now ping ponging between the Lords and the Commons. The Commons accepted the majority of the Lords amendments, which were tabled by the Government and were aimed at adding or strengthening safeguards. The Commons rejected amendments tabled by Baroness Hollins, with cross … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, October 2016

Parliament The Public Accounts Committee has published a report on the Ministry of Justice’s reforms to the probation system, aimed at reducing reoffending. The report expressed concerns about a lack of progress with the reforms. The new Secretary of State for Justice Liz Truss has given evidence to the Justice Committee. She confirmed that the … Continue reading

Tribunal Statistics, April to June 2016

By Robert Thomas The Ministry of Justice recently released the tribunal statistics for April-June 2016. This note highlights some of the principal points of interest from the statistics. Social security There are two points to highlight from the statistics on social security appeals. First, there is the high success rates of appeals concerning two of … Continue reading