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archives

Judicial review

This category contains 39 posts

Courts challenge ombud’s approach to determining service failure

UKAJI is publishing a series of blog posts about the Court of Appeal decision in Miller v Health Service Commissioner [2018] EWCA Civ 144 (February 2018), which identified a number of failures in the investigation by the Health Service Ombudsman for England. The first post, by Richard Kirkham, considered what the judgment tells us about judicial approaches to … Continue reading

New Tribunal powers for health and social care – key points from the guidance

Originally posted on rightsinreality:
So from April* the SEN and Disability Tribunal will have new powers to make ‘non binding recommendations’ on health and social care needs and provision in EHC Plans for disabled children and young people. There is an excellent overview of the Tribunal’s new powers on the Contact website. This is potentially…

Opportunity – researching administrative procedures and guidelines

Expressions of interest are sought from experts in administrative law to gather data for the Protego (Procedural Tools for Effective Governance) project, which is an advanced project funded by the European Research Council – more on the project and team is available here. The commission is a temporary assignment that requires technical expertise in one … Continue reading

Safeguarding procedural fairness or imposing excessive legalism?

  UKAJI is publishing a series of blog posts about the Court of Appeal decision in Miller v Health Service Commissioner [2018] EWCA Civ 144 (February 2018), which identified a number of failures in the investigation by the Health Service Ombudsman for England. This first post, by Richard Kirkham, considers what the judgment tells us about judicial approaches … Continue reading

New research: Rule of law and access to justice concerns in immigration detention

  New research uses the concepts of the rule of law and access to justice to investigate the situation of people in immigration detention in the UK. Each year some 30,000 people with immigration status issues spend varying lengths of time in the nine dedicated ‘Immigration Removal Centres’ around the country. The UK, which has … Continue reading