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Research

This category contains 154 posts

Between the rules: Administrative justice and the enforcement of social security law in The Netherlands

Between the rules: Administrative justice and the enforcement of social security law in The Netherlands By Paulien de Winter   In April 2019, I attended the SLSA conference at the University of Leeds. I presented my work on enforcement of social security law in the Netherlands called ‘Enforcement Styles at Social Security Agencies’.  This empirical research … Continue reading

Court of Protection Mediation Research – Where are we in the UK?

By Charlotte May   This month a new report by Charlotte May was launched to address the question ‘Where are we in the UK in Court of Protection mediation?’   CoP Mediation The key and fundamental difference in mediation in the CoP relates to a person’s capacity. In these cases mediation works towards a negotiated … Continue reading

The ‘Administrative Justice’ of Government Data Sharing for Research: a Primer

  The ‘Administrative Justice’ of Government Data Sharing for Research: a Primer   By Stergios Aidinlis   In April, at the annual SLSA conference in Leeds, I presented a paper based on my doctoral research on administrative data sharing decision-making in the UK. This post first presents the background of this research and then discusses … Continue reading

Big Data in Public Administration: Rewards, Risk and Responses

  Big Data in Public Administration: Rewards, Risk and Responses   By Paul Daly (University of Cambridge)   In April 2019, I was at the Socio-Legal Studies Association Conference at the University of Leeds, presenting a work in progress, “Artificial Administration: Administrative Justice in the Age of Machines”. In this post, I explain my interest … Continue reading

“Hello Dungavel!”: observations on the use of video link technology in immigration bail hearings

“Hello Dungavel!”: observations on the use of video link technology in immigration bail hearings   By Jo Hynes   Immigration bail hearings are by nature unspectacular. They are short, take place in chaotic hearing centres, and have fewer immediate consequences than other hearings in the First Tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber). Still, they offer … Continue reading