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Research

This category contains 115 posts

Seminar report: Complaints about public services – where next for the ombud?

Reform of public-sector ombuds was the focus of a seminar on 5 February 2018, co-hosted by JUSTICE, the Ombudsman Association, and UKAJI. It was attended by more than 50 practitioners, law makers, researchers and policy makers and generated a lively discussion about the reform of the public-sector ombud. Below are some background context and a … Continue reading

Mental Health Tribunals: Examining current practice, rising caseloads and next steps

  By Nicola Glover-Thomas This report results from a one-day policy seminar in December 2017, Mental Health Tribunals: Evaluating Current Practice and Moving Forward, funded by the University of Manchester and The UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI). The seminar was part of a project sponsored by UKAJI and HM Courts and Tribunals Service to explore … Continue reading

Call for participation: Researching administrative power workshop

Researching administrative power The dramatic Grenfell Tower fire in London in 2017 illustrates poignantly the need to articulate specific administrative fields (fire inspections, building material regulation, poverty alleviation, housing, financial support to vulnerable communities) and to develop responses across the administrative system (regulation, accountability, learning from past mistakes). Rule-making and implementation of administrative decisions are indeed becoming embedded in … Continue reading

Research Roadmap: Where we’ve been and where we need to go with administrative justice research

Today the UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI) publishes its Research Roadmap, proposing a way forward for empirical research in administrative justice. In doing so we build on earlier work by Nuffield’s Law in the Real World inquiry and the Research Agenda of the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council (AJTC). A fundamental purpose of research is … Continue reading

What do we know and what do we need to know? A review of research on public-sector ombuds

By Dr Nick O’Brien In December 2016, the Cabinet Office published the draft Public Service Ombudsman Bill, setting out its proposals for bringing together the responsibilities of the current Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman and the Local Government Ombudsman to create a new organisation with strengthened governance and accountability for complaints about public services in England. This review explores what research has been … Continue reading