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Research

This category contains 198 posts

(Lacking in) Methodological Rigour, Human Rights and Devolution: IRAL’s challenge is one of process as well as substance

(Lacking in) Methodological Rigour, Human Rights and Devolution: IRAL’s challenge is one of process as well as substance By Katie Boyle and Diana Camps (University of Stirling) The Independent Review of Administrative Law (IRAL) manifests as an example of methodological research practice that is inherently flawed from the outset. We argue here that the review … Continue reading

Contracting out and administrative justice

Contracting out and administrative justice Robert Thomas (University of Manchester) Much of the thinking and debate about administrative justice concerns the need for government to make good quality original decisions and to get things right first time. If only administrative officials could become better at making decisions and learning from their errors, then the range … Continue reading

Out of the frying pan…? Legal action research into EEA nationals’ access to welfare support during the transition and beyond.

Out of the frying pan…? Legal action research into EEA nationals’ access to welfare support during the transition and beyond Charlotte O’Brien and Alice Welsh (University of York) Even before the referendum, EEA nationals and their family members faced a host of complex legal and administrative obstacles accessing their welfare rights. As we near the … Continue reading

Relaunch: UKAJI call for blogs and opinions on Covid-19 and administrative justice

Relaunch: UKAJI call for blogs and opinions on Covid-19 and administrative justice What now seems a lifetime ago, on 24 March 2020 UKAJI launched its initial call for blogs and opinions on Covid-19 and administrative justice. In that time, UKAJI has published a range of pieces on the subject, including: Sam Guy, ‘Judicial review and … Continue reading

Joe Tomlinson: A Review of Reimagining Administrative Justice: Human Rights in Small Places by Margaret Doyle and Nick O’Brien

Joe Tomlinson: A Review of Reimagining Administrative Justice: Human Rights in Small Places by Margaret Doyle and Nick O’Brien I disagree with a number of the claims advanced in Margaret Doyle and Nick O’Brien’s Reimagining Administrative Justice: Human Rights in Small Places. But, in so doing, I was forced to examine some of my most … Continue reading