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Research

This category contains 142 posts

Public law and administrative decision-making: Two key questions for research

By Joe Tomlinson This post, based on a seminar held at King’s College London and supported by the Public Law Project and the UK Administrative Justice Institute, examines the potential for the further development of research at the intersection of public law and administrative decision-making. Speakers at the event included Dr Bernardo Zacka (MIT), Dr … Continue reading

Book review: Responsive Legality: The New Administrative Justice

By Naomi Creutzfeldt In this blog post, Naomi Creutzfeldt reviews a new book by Zach Richards, Responsive Legality: The New Administrative Justice (Routledge 2019). In his recent book, Zach Richards presents a theory of administrative justice for the 21st century: responsive legality. He argues that ‘responsive legality is the new justifying logic of twenty-first-century administrative … Continue reading

UKAJI administrative justice research database

By Lee Marsons Today, I am delighted to publish on behalf of UKAJI the first step in establishing a public database of research related to administrative justice in the United Kingdom. Currently, the database contains around two hundred documents, ranging from books and journal articles, to governmental and third sector reports and House of Commons … Continue reading

Book Review: Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life

By Dr Zach Richards In this blog post, Zach Richards reviews a new book by Marc Hertogh, Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life (2018, Palgrave Socio-Legal Studies). Marc Hertogh’s recent book Nobody’s Law makes a valuable contribution to socio-legal studies of administrative justice. The clear, well-written text published in the Palgrave MacMillan … Continue reading

‘Not the same without us’: A Place for Inclusive Research?

By Ben Walsh The ‘A Place at the Table’ project identified that young people (YP) with SEND currently have few opportunities to enact their legal rights when it comes to having a voice in decision-making. The project called for more research into processes for resolving disputes about SEND issues, focusing on participation and outcomes for … Continue reading