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This category contains 49 posts

Administrative law and the digital welfare state in the UK and Australia

Administrative law and the digital welfare state in the UK and Australia Jack Maxwell (Research Fellow in Public Law and Technology, Public Law Project)   Technology plays a central role in the modern welfare state. Governments are increasingly using technology to confirm identities, assess eligibility, calculate and make payments, and detect fraud. This new mode … Continue reading

Judicial review during the Covid-19 pandemic (Part I)

Judicial review during the Covid-19 pandemic (Part I) By Joe Tomlinson (University of York), Jack Maxwell (Public Law Project), Jo Hynes (University of Exeter), and Emma Marshall (University of Exeter). This piece originally appeared on the Admin Law Blog on 26 May 2020 and can be found here. It is reposted with permission and thanks. … Continue reading

Online hearings and the quality of justice

Online hearings and the quality of justice By Johnny Tan (LLB student, LSE)   In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, Her Majesty’s Courts & Tribunals Service (HMCTS) has increased the use of audio and video technology to maintain the functioning of the justice system. However, whether such measures can adequately replace face-to-face hearings and how … Continue reading

Germany – a federal executive power grab?

Germany – a federal executive power grab? By Stefan Theil (Bonavero Institute of Human Rights)   The German Infectious Diseases Protection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz – IDPA) is the primary federal statute regulating the fight against covid-19 in Germany. The Act has been recently amended to provide the federal government with a greater role in enforcement and … Continue reading

A nation comes of age: what next for the Welsh devolution settlement?

A nation comes of age: what next for the Welsh devolution settlement? By Callum Robertson (University of Essex) Of the three legislative devolution settlements that currently exist within the United Kingdom, the one concerning Wales is arguably the most interesting in terms of sociological and legal study. Here we have a nation that was practically … Continue reading