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Judiciary

This category contains 33 posts

Mandatory Orders and the enforcement of public law duties: R (Imam) v Croydon LBC

Mandatory Orders and the enforcement of public law duties: R (Imam) v Croydon LBC By Gabriel Tan In public law, the imposition of a duty on a public body means that the body must act in a particular way, or secure a particular outcome. Where these duties are not fulfilled, the most direct and effective … Continue reading

Debating judicial power after the Independent Review of Administrative Law

Debating judicial power after the Independent Review of Administrative Law By Gabriel Tan On 18th March, the Cambridge Union hosted their Final Debate of Lent 2021 on the motion: ‘This House Believes Judges Make Better Law Than Politicians’, with two former Supreme Court Justices, Lord Sumption and Lord Neuberger, speaking on opposite sides of the … Continue reading

Lessons in the teaching of administrative law: A review of The Anatomy of Administrative Law

Lessons in the teaching of administrative law: A review of The Anatomy of Administrative Law By Richard Kirkham (University of Sheffield) Administrative law scholarship has changed in nature in recent years. Abstract debates around ultra vires have been replaced by the more confrontational challenge to the reach of judicial review posed by conservative think-tanks and … Continue reading

(Lacking in) Methodological Rigour, Human Rights and Devolution: IRAL’s challenge is one of process as well as substance

(Lacking in) Methodological Rigour, Human Rights and Devolution: IRAL’s challenge is one of process as well as substance By Katie Boyle and Diana Camps (University of Stirling) The Independent Review of Administrative Law (IRAL) manifests as an example of methodological research practice that is inherently flawed from the outset. We argue here that the review … Continue reading

UKAJI’s submission to the IRAL – a summary

UKAJI’s submission to the IRAL – a summary By Lee Marsons, Maurice Sunkin and Theodore Konstadinides (University of Essex). A version of this post initially appeared on the UKCLA blog on 26 October 2020 and can be found here. On 20 October, the UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI) made available on its website its submission … Continue reading