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Internal review

This category contains 16 posts

When things go very wrong with decision-making by public bodies (and their private contractors)

Today we learned that the cases of 23,000 claimants who did not appeal a decision on their tax credits will have their cases reviewed (see here). These are decisions made by Concentrix, the private contractor hired by HMRC in May 2014 to help cut alleged fraud in the tax credit system. The contract with Concentrix … Continue reading

‘A sorry episode for the welfare state’: Concentrix and Mandatory Reconsiderations

By Robert Thomas This blog provides an update on the handling of tax credit checks by Concentrix. It also presents and considers newly released data concerning the outcome of mandatory reconsiderations decided by Concentrix. Earlier in 2016, concerns were raised about tax credit compliance checks undertaken by a private company, Concentrix, on behalf of HM … Continue reading

New ESRC Report Launched – Current issues in administrative justice: Examining administrative review, better initial decisions, and tribunal reform

By Robert Thomas (University of Manchester) and Joe Tomlinson (University of Sheffield) Profound changes in the way law interacts with administration are underway. Recently, the Ministry of Justice announced a near £1-billion funding injection to modernise the justice system. A considerable part of this effort will involve substantial revisions being made to the delivery of administrative … Continue reading

Administrative justice – A primer for policymakers and those working in the system

By Joe Tomlinson and Robert Thomas This is a short primer targeted at those working within administrative justice. It provides an accessible overview of the key models of administrative justice in the academic literature. What is administrative justice? This is no single answer to this question. On the contrary, there is an ongoing discussion about … Continue reading

Report shines a spotlight on initial decision-making and Mandatory Reconsideration

Every year the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) makes 12 million decisions on social security benefits. As the Social Security Advisory Committee (SSAC) notes in a recent report, with such volumes it’s not surprising if mistakes are made. Only a small proportion of these decisions are challenged by claimants, but the processes for review … Continue reading