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Internal review

This category contains 20 posts

Designing a social security system with human rights at the core: Scrutiny of the Social Security (Scotland) Bill

  Members of UKAJI were among the more than 100 individuals and organisations giving written evidence to the Scottish Parliament’s Social Security Committee in its scrutiny of the Social Security (Scotland) Bill. The Bill sets out seven principles for Scottish social security, including the principle that social security is a human right. This post gives … Continue reading

Mandatory reconsideration: Inadequate by design

By Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson In September 2017, the Work and Pensions Committee launched an inquiry into how the assessment processes for Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Personal Independence Payments (PIP) are handled by Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) contractors ATOS, Capita and Maximus, and how the application, assessment and appeals processes for … Continue reading

New journal article published: Mapping current issues in administrative justice: austerity and the ‘more bureaucratic rationality’ approach

By Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson We have published a new paper in the Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law entitled “Mapping current issues in administrative justice: austerity and the ‘more bureaucratic rationality’ approach”. The paper draws upon our ESRC-funded policy seminar on administrative justice decisions, reviews, and appeals. The abstract of the paper is … Continue reading

Immigration administrative review: the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration’s second report

By Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson The Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration (ICIBI) recently published his second report on the Home Office’s administrative review process. This blog provides some context for this report and also analyses its contents.  The new immigration administrative review process In recent years, government has reformed administrative redress processes. … Continue reading

When things go very wrong with decision-making by public bodies (and their private contractors)

Today we learned that the cases of 23,000 claimants who did not appeal a decision on their tax credits will have their cases reviewed (see here). These are decisions made by Concentrix, the private contractor hired by HMRC in May 2014 to help cut alleged fraud in the tax credit system. The contract with Concentrix … Continue reading