//
archives

Social security and welfare benefits

This category contains 45 posts

Book review: Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment? Benefit Sanctions in the UK

By Brian Thompson In this blog post, Brian Thompson reviews a new book by Michael Adler, Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment? Benefit Sanctions in the UK (2018, Palgrave Socio-Legal Studies). Michael Adler explains that the project of this book is to give a critical account of the benefit sanctions regime in the UK and to … Continue reading

New publications explore benefits sanctions and legal consciousness

Two books of interest to the administrative justice community have recently been published. Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment by Michael Adler subjects benefit sanctions in the UK to a critique from the perspective of administrative justice. Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life by Marc Hertogh examines legal consciousness and, through empirical … Continue reading

Universal Credit – When evidence becomes politicised

In our Research Roadmap published in February of this year, UKAJI cited the roll-out of Universal Credit (UC) as an example of the extraordinary impact of administrative justice on the day-to-day lives of people. In this blog post, we consider the recent report by the National Audit Office (NAO) on its independent review of UC, … Continue reading

Social rights are finally entering the political mainstream – but they’re also in jeopardy

Political leaders, trade unions, national human rights institutions, non-governmental organisations and the public at large are beginning to grasp the transformative potential of social rights. But this progress is in danger. 630 more words via Social rights are finally entering the political mainstream – but they’re also in jeopardy — Left Foot Forward

Lessons Learnt – Administrative justice data scoping report

This post describes the lessons learnt during the production of a preliminary scoping report on administrative justice data on social security. The project was part of the wider scoping and capacity-building work of the UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI). The report has been made available to the community as an open-source public book via GitBook,[7] … Continue reading