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Social security and welfare benefits

This category contains 48 posts

Defining vulnerability in the enforcement of public debts

  Defining vulnerability in the enforcement of public debts Jennie Bunt This is a revised version of an original blog-post on the website of The Justice Gap   Testing the boundaries of definitions When the accessibility of justice is threatened, considerable strain is placed on legal definitions. Such definitions carve out the boundaries of, for … Continue reading

Book review – Radical Help: How We Can Remake the Relationships Between Us and Revolutionise the Welfare State, by Hilary Cottam (2018)

Book Review Radical Help: How We Can Remake the Relationships Between Us and Revolutionise the Welfare State. By Hilary Cottam. 2018. 308pp. By Carolyn Hirst I first read Radical Help by Hilary Cottam in October last year and I have been urging people to read it ever since. So I am delighted to have the … Continue reading

Making the totally unacceptable slightly more palatable

In this post, Michael Adler examines a recent report on benefit sanctions from the House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee and considers that its proposals for change are to be welcomed but are disappointing in that they make a system that is unacceptable only slightly more palatable.[1] By Michael Adler In its latest report … Continue reading

Book review: Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment? Benefit Sanctions in the UK

By Brian Thompson In this blog post, Brian Thompson reviews a new book by Michael Adler, Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment? Benefit Sanctions in the UK (2018, Palgrave Socio-Legal Studies). Michael Adler explains that the project of this book is to give a critical account of the benefit sanctions regime in the UK and to … Continue reading

New publications explore benefits sanctions and legal consciousness

Two books of interest to the administrative justice community have recently been published. Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment by Michael Adler subjects benefit sanctions in the UK to a critique from the perspective of administrative justice. Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life by Marc Hertogh examines legal consciousness and, through empirical … Continue reading