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UKAJI

This category contains 42 posts

Young people’s participation in SEND dispute resolution: A Place at the Table roundtable discussion

This blog post summarises a recent roundtable discussion that sheds light on an aspect of administrative justice in action in everyday life: the participation of young people in resolving disputes with local authorities about their special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) support needs. The full report of the roundtable discussion is available to download here and for viewing … Continue reading

Establishing a UK-wide hub on administrative justice research: Report on UKAJI’s Phase 1

By Maurice Sunkin In December 2017, the UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI) reached the end of its first phase, which began in September 2014 with funding from the Nuffield Foundation. Since the start of 2018, with support from the University of Essex School of Law, UKAJI has continued to support and grow the administrative justice … Continue reading

What is administrative justice? UKAJI’s website has the answers

‘What is administrative justice?’ is one of the pages on our website most viewed by visitors. At UKAJI, we’ve spent a lot of time thinking about the answer to this question – and, more importantly, why it matters. We’ve developed a range of resources to help illuminate what we know and understand about administrative justice … Continue reading

What do we know about the role of young people in SEND dispute resolution? A research overview: Part 1

By Margaret Doyle This post is in two parts: Part 1, published here, sets out what we know from research about young people’s involvement in special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) dispute resolution; Part 2 explores what we know about involving young people with SEN in research. The two-part post forms part of a knowledge-exchange project, … Continue reading

Lessons Learnt – Administrative justice data scoping report

This post describes the lessons learnt during the production of a preliminary scoping report on administrative justice data on social security. The project was part of the wider scoping and capacity-building work of the UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI). The report has been made available to the community as an open-source public book via GitBook,[7] … Continue reading