//
archives

UK Parliament

This category contains 52 posts

Debating judicial power after the Independent Review of Administrative Law

Debating judicial power after the Independent Review of Administrative Law By Gabriel Tan On 18th March, the Cambridge Union hosted their Final Debate of Lent 2021 on the motion: ‘This House Believes Judges Make Better Law Than Politicians’, with two former Supreme Court Justices, Lord Sumption and Lord Neuberger, speaking on opposite sides of the … Continue reading

COVID-19 and administrative justice – a call for blogs, opinions, and news

COVID-19 and administrative justice – a call for blogs, opinions, and news By now, it is inevitable that the spread of Covid-19 will have substantial political, social, economic, and human consequences all across the globe. This is also true in the legal sphere. For this reason, UKAJI intends today to launch a series of blogs, … Continue reading

Producing the next UK White Paper on Welfare Benefits: the Commission on Social Security, led by Experts by Experience

Producing the next UK White Paper on Welfare Benefits: the Commission on Social Security, led by Experts by Experience        By Rosa Morris (Independent Researcher), Michael Orton (University of Warwick), and and Kate Summers (London School of Economics). Kate Summers (L) and Michael Orton (R) pictured.   This blog introduces a new project … Continue reading

The PHSO at the PACAC: Rob Behrens and the Public Administration Committee

  The PHSO at the PACAC: Rob Behrens and the Public Administration Committee   By Lee Marsons   On Tuesday 22nd January 2019, Rob Behrens, the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombud (‘PHSO’) and Amanda Campbell, the PHSO’s CEO, appeared before the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee (‘PACAC’) for their periodic interrogation. Watching the evidence … Continue reading

Joint Committee on Human Rights highlights systemic failure in its report on Windrush detention

  Today the UK Parliament’s Joint Committee on Human Rights publishes a damning report on the Home Office’s treatment of two members of the Windrush generation who were wrongfully detained and whose cases reflect, in the views of the Committee, what was ‘in all likelihood a systemic failure’. By Margaret Doyle The Joint Committee on … Continue reading