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Scotland

This category contains 31 posts

Universal Credit – When evidence becomes politicised

In our Research Roadmap published in February of this year, UKAJI cited the roll-out of Universal Credit (UC) as an example of the extraordinary impact of administrative justice on the day-to-day lives of people. In this blog post, we consider the recent report by the National Audit Office (NAO) on its independent review of UC, … Continue reading

Mapping the Bodies involved in Health Redress in the United Kingdom

UKAJI has commissioned this research to explain the UK health systems and map the bodies involved in health redress in order to provide a resource for researchers who want to study aspects of the system, including regulators and ombuds. It is hoped that it may also contribute to the identification and discussion of pressure points … Continue reading

Conference launches research and guidance on supporting employees who have been complained about

A conference co-organised by the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO), Queen Margaret University (QMU), and the University of Glasgow took place in Edinburgh on Tuesday 5 December. The conference explored how best to support public-service employees who have been subject to a complaint. The conference launched an SPSO report on ‘Making Complaints Work for Everyone’. … Continue reading

Designing a social security system with human rights at the core: Scrutiny of the Social Security (Scotland) Bill

  Members of UKAJI were among the more than 100 individuals and organisations giving written evidence to the Scottish Parliament’s Social Security Committee in its scrutiny of the Social Security (Scotland) Bill. The Bill sets out seven principles for Scottish social security, including the principle that social security is a human right. This post gives … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, November 2017

Parliament The EU (Withdrawal) Bill has begun its Committee stage in the House of Commons. The government has given assurances that parliament will be given a vote on whether or not to accept the deal agreed upon. However, in the event that parliament does not approve the deal, the UK will exit the EU nonetheless. … Continue reading