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Wales

This category contains 30 posts

Ten Years of the Administrative Court in Wales: Success or Failure?

“Ten Years of the Administrative Court in Wales: Success or Failure?”   By Sarah Nason (Bangor Law School) and David Gardner (No 5 Chambers)   At the 2019 Legal Wales Conference, David Gardner and Sarah Nason concluded that the Administrative Court in Wales has been a constitutional success and a jurisdictional improvement. On the other … Continue reading

Administrative Justice Council (AJC) Academic Panel Workshop: Mapping Administrative Justice

AJC Academic Panel Workshop: Mapping administrative justice By Heidi Bancroft   The Academic Panel to the AJC is holding a workshop on mapping the administrative justice landscape in Wales and Scotland on Wednesday 19th June at 11:30-14:15  at Freshfields in Manchester (https://www.freshfields.com/en-gb/contacts/contact-us/europe/manchester-office/).  We will have presentations from Dr Sarah Nason (Bangor), Pete Butcher (Bangor University … Continue reading

Defining vulnerability in the enforcement of public debts

  Defining vulnerability in the enforcement of public debts Jennie Bunt This is a revised version of an original blog-post on the website of The Justice Gap   Testing the boundaries of definitions When the accessibility of justice is threatened, considerable strain is placed on legal definitions. Such definitions carve out the boundaries of, for … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, December 2017

Parliament Note: Some Parliamentary items are included under subject-specific headings below. Committee stage debate on the EU (Withdrawal) Bill continues in the House of Commons. The Government has suffered its first defeat on the Bill on an amendment tabled by Dominic Grieve, which provides that ministers’ powers to implement the Brexit withdrawal agreement by order … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, November 2017

Parliament The EU (Withdrawal) Bill has begun its Committee stage in the House of Commons. The government has given assurances that parliament will be given a vote on whether or not to accept the deal agreed upon. However, in the event that parliament does not approve the deal, the UK will exit the EU nonetheless. … Continue reading