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Ombuds and reviewers

This category contains 97 posts

Re-imagining public-sector complaint systems

  By Chris Gill Public-sector complaint systems often do not meet the needs of those who use them, those who operate them, and others who have a stake in them.[1] They can be hard to access, they can be costly, and their broader public value is rarely demonstrated. At the same time, the theoretical potential … Continue reading

Young people’s participation in SEND dispute resolution: A Place at the Table roundtable discussion

This blog post summarises a recent roundtable discussion that sheds light on an aspect of administrative justice in action in everyday life: the participation of young people in resolving disputes with local authorities about their special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) support needs. The full report of the roundtable discussion is available to download here and for viewing … Continue reading

Book review: Ombudsmen and ADR: A Comparative Study of Informal Justice in Europe

By Nick O’Brien Nick O’Brien reviews a new book by Naomi Creutzfeldt on her study exploring national differences in complainants’ levels of trust in ombuds. In her timely new book, Ombudsmen and ADR: A Comparative Study of Informal Justice in Europe, Naomi Creutzfeldt (University of Westminster) shows that ‘the relationships people have with the informal … Continue reading

Designing a Public Services Ombud scheme for Jersey

Researchers from the University of Essex are exploring the design of a new public-sector ombud in conjunction with the Jersey Law Commission. By Andrew Le Sueur and Margaret Doyle Background The current project has had a long gestation. In 2000, the Review Panel on Machinery of Government in Jersey (chaired by Sir Cecil Clothier) recommended … Continue reading

Courts challenge ombud’s approach to determining service failure

UKAJI is publishing a series of blog posts about the Court of Appeal decision in Miller v Health Service Commissioner [2018] EWCA Civ 144 (February 2018), which identified a number of failures in the investigation by the Health Service Ombudsman for England. The first post, by Richard Kirkham, considered what the judgment tells us about judicial approaches to … Continue reading