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System design

This category contains 69 posts

New publication – Reimagining Administrative Justice: Human Rights in Small Places (Doyle & O’Brien, 2019)

‘Grenfell, Windrush, Hillsborough – these and other tragedies bring into sharp focus the necessary partnership of social rights and the actions of the state.’      Reimagining Administrative Justice: Human rights in small places reconnects everyday justice with social rights. It rediscovers human rights in the ‘small places’ of housing, education, health and social care, where … Continue reading

Reform of the administrative justice system: a plea for change and a research agenda

Reform of the administrative justice system: a plea for change and a research agenda   By Richard Kirkham (University of Sheffield) (L) and Naomi Creutzfeldt (University of Westminster) (R)       This post is a response to recent overlapping speeches given by the Senior President of Tribunals (SPT), Sir Ernest Ryder, with a particular … Continue reading

Producing the next UK White Paper on Welfare Benefits: the Commission on Social Security, led by Experts by Experience

Producing the next UK White Paper on Welfare Benefits: the Commission on Social Security, led by Experts by Experience        By Rosa Morris (Independent Researcher), Michael Orton (University of Warwick), and and Kate Summers (London School of Economics). Kate Summers (L) and Michael Orton (R) pictured.   This blog introduces a new project … Continue reading

Making the totally unacceptable slightly more palatable

In this post, Michael Adler examines a recent report on benefit sanctions from the House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee and considers that its proposals for change are to be welcomed but are disappointing in that they make a system that is unacceptable only slightly more palatable.[1] By Michael Adler In its latest report … Continue reading

Re-imagining public-sector complaint systems

  By Chris Gill Public-sector complaint systems often do not meet the needs of those who use them, those who operate them, and others who have a stake in them.[1] They can be hard to access, they can be costly, and their broader public value is rarely demonstrated. At the same time, the theoretical potential … Continue reading