//
archives

System design

This category contains 62 posts

Universal Credit – When evidence becomes politicised

In our Research Roadmap published in February of this year, UKAJI cited the roll-out of Universal Credit (UC) as an example of the extraordinary impact of administrative justice on the day-to-day lives of people. In this blog post, we consider the recent report by the National Audit Office (NAO) on its independent review of UC, … Continue reading

Grenfell – an administrative justice case study, one year on

This week is the one-year anniversary of the fire at Grenfell Tower. The fire led to the deaths of 72 people; it has been called a tragedy and a preventable mass fatality, both terms implying different degrees of accountability of public bodies. We have learned much over the past year about the causes of the … Continue reading

Designing a Public Services Ombud scheme for Jersey

Researchers from the University of Essex are exploring the design of a new public-sector ombud in conjunction with the Jersey Law Commission. By Andrew Le Sueur and Margaret Doyle Background The current project has had a long gestation. In 2000, the Review Panel on Machinery of Government in Jersey (chaired by Sir Cecil Clothier) recommended … Continue reading

An example of how administrative justice design considerations apply across the justice system

Transparency, accountability and the role of internal review – key administrative justice design considerations – feature in proposed changes to the way the Parole Board makes decisions. The Worboys case, heard in the High Court on 13-14 March 2018, is the first time a victim has challenged a Parole Board decision. Two victims of the … Continue reading

New Report: The Digitalisation of Tribunals

Tribunals are a major part of the administrative justice system. The Government has begun to introduce digital procedures in tribunals but the full details of the changes remain to be seen. This report—commissioned by the UK Administrative Justice Institute—outlines ‘what we know and what we need to know’ about the digitalisation of tribunals. It takes … Continue reading