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Prisons/detention centres

This category contains 12 posts

What’s new in administrative justice, March 2017

UK Parliament After suffering two defeats in the House of Lords on the EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill, the Government now has the power to trigger Article 50 and begin Brexit negotiations. One of the amendments would have required the Government to guarantee the rights of EU citizens in the UK post Brexit and the … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, February 2017

UK Parliament The “Brexit Bill” has completed its passage through the House of Commons. The Bill, which would give permission to the Prime Minister to invoke Article 50, thus triggering the process of Britain’s exit from the EU, was passed unamended. Second reading in the House of Lords is scheduled to begin on 20 February. … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, December 2016

UK Parliament SNP MP Mhairi Black has published a Private Members’ Bill that would require the assessment of a benefit claimant’s circumstances before the implementation of sanctions. The Benefit Claimants Sanctions (Required Assessment) Bill is expected to resume its second reading debate on 24 January 2017, having been adjourned on 2 December. A Commons Library … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, November 2016

UK Parliament The Investigatory Powers Bill has entered its final stage and is now ping ponging between the Lords and the Commons. The Commons accepted the majority of the Lords amendments, which were tabled by the Government and were aimed at adding or strengthening safeguards. The Commons rejected amendments tabled by Baroness Hollins, with cross … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, July 2016

Parliament The House of Commons has debated the issue of courts and tribunals fees. The debate followed publication by the Justice Committee of a report looking at the impact of recent changes. The Committee concluded that it is not objectionable in principle for users of the courts to pay a contribution towards operating costs, but … Continue reading