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Immigration and asylum

This category contains 52 posts

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme   Joe Tomlinson     In the fraught context of Brexit, the need to register EU citizens already resident in the UK presented a major conundrum of policy, law, and administration. The answer that has been offered by the government is the … Continue reading

“Hello Dungavel!”: observations on the use of video link technology in immigration bail hearings

“Hello Dungavel!”: observations on the use of video link technology in immigration bail hearings   By Jo Hynes   Immigration bail hearings are by nature unspectacular. They are short, take place in chaotic hearing centres, and have fewer immediate consequences than other hearings in the First Tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber). Still, they offer … Continue reading

Brexit and Administrative Justice: An Early Analysis (Part III – Redress and the Courts)

Brexit and Administrative Justice: An Early Analysis (Part III – Redress and the Courts)  By Joe Tomlinson   In the previous two posts in this series, I have highlighted some key emerging trends in law and administration linked to Brexit. In this final post, I address the question of where redress procedures and the courts … Continue reading

Brexit and Administrative Justice: An Early Analysis (Part II – Emerging Trends)

Brexit and Administrative Justice: An Early Analysis (Part II – Emerging Trends) By Joe Tomlinson   In a previous post in this series, I introduced a framework for understanding trends in law and administration during the Brexit process. That framework had three parts: internal organisation issues; external coordination issues; and substantive legal issues. In this … Continue reading

Brexit and Administrative Justice: An Early Analysis (Part I – A Framework)

By Joe Tomlinson   Brexit and Administrative Justice: An Early Analysis (Part I – A Framework)   In this series of three blog posts, initially prepared as an informal discussion paper for a Bonavero Institute of Human Rights seminar, I consider the relationship between Brexit, administration, and law. Each of these topics are vast. When … Continue reading