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Immigration and asylum

This category contains 57 posts

The Law Commission Report on Simplification of the Immigration Rules: Proposals to reformat the Immigration Rules fail to tackle the hard issues

The Law Commission Report on Simplification of the Immigration Rules: Proposals to reformat the Immigration Rules fail to tackle the hard issues   Introduction The Immigration Rules define the day-to-day administration of the UK’s regime of visas to enter and remain in the UK. The current Immigration Rules, which have increased in length from 300 … Continue reading

Book review: The Windrush Betrayal: Exposing the Hostile Environment, by Amelia Gentleman (Faber & Faber 2019)

Book review: The Windrush Betrayal: Exposing the Hostile Environment, by Amelia Gentleman (Faber & Faber 2019)       ‘This is a story about who gets listened to in Britain and who gets ignored. It’s about race, poverty and marginalisation.’ Amelia Gentleman, The Windrush Betrayal   By Margaret Doyle   There are many stories told … Continue reading

The EU Settlement Scheme: Trends and Forecasts

The EU Settlement Scheme: Trends and Forecasts   By Alice Welsh & Joe Tomlinson (University of York and Public Law Project)     The EU Settlement Scheme was established to allow EU citizens resident in the UK to apply to remain in the UK after Brexit. The Scheme is novel and complex in various respects … Continue reading

How Immigration Judicial Review Works

How immigration judicial review works    Robert Thomas (R) and Joe Tomlinson (L)      Two years ago on this blog, we drew attention to the immigration judicial review system—by far the most active area of judicial review litigation and the vast majority of all judicial reviews in England and Wales. In that post, we … Continue reading

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.   By Sarah Craig (University of Glasgow)   Providing an interpreter addresses individuals’ access to justice rights, and it also promotes accountable decisions, based on appropriately translated information.[i]  But interpreting in justice settings is not straightforward, and digitalisation adds … Continue reading