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Immigration and asylum

This category contains 44 posts

Windrush – what are the administrative justice dimensions?

‘You would be surprised how often the just society, the good life, human happiness, call it what you will, is pushed out of our reach, not by the malevolence of some people, usually referred to as ” they,” who are consciously depriving us of it, or by the inertia of those to whom we entrust … Continue reading

Design and implementation of a high-quality probability sample: Lessons learnt

Originally posted on lucindaplatt:
Migration research is one of the most rapidly developing fields of demography in Europe. To develop an empirically-based theoretical understanding of immigration we need high-quality representative data. However, surveys of immigrants often are confronted with challenges of coverage, representativeness and response rates and cannot face the high costs needed to overcome…

What’s new in administrative justice, December 2017

Parliament Note: Some Parliamentary items are included under subject-specific headings below. Committee stage debate on the EU (Withdrawal) Bill continues in the House of Commons. The Government has suffered its first defeat on the Bill on an amendment tabled by Dominic Grieve, which provides that ministers’ powers to implement the Brexit withdrawal agreement by order … Continue reading

New research: Rule of law and access to justice concerns in immigration detention

  New research uses the concepts of the rule of law and access to justice to investigate the situation of people in immigration detention in the UK. Each year some 30,000 people with immigration status issues spend varying lengths of time in the nine dedicated ‘Immigration Removal Centres’ around the country. The UK, which has … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, November 2017

Parliament The EU (Withdrawal) Bill has begun its Committee stage in the House of Commons. The government has given assurances that parliament will be given a vote on whether or not to accept the deal agreed upon. However, in the event that parliament does not approve the deal, the UK will exit the EU nonetheless. … Continue reading