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Immigration and asylum

This category contains 55 posts

The EU Settlement Scheme: Trends and Forecasts

The EU Settlement Scheme: Trends and Forecasts   By Alice Welsh & Joe Tomlinson (University of York and Public Law Project)     The EU Settlement Scheme was established to allow EU citizens resident in the UK to apply to remain in the UK after Brexit. The Scheme is novel and complex in various respects … Continue reading

How Immigration Judicial Review Works

How immigration judicial review works    Robert Thomas (R) and Joe Tomlinson (L)      Two years ago on this blog, we drew attention to the immigration judicial review system—by far the most active area of judicial review litigation and the vast majority of all judicial reviews in England and Wales. In that post, we … Continue reading

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.   By Sarah Craig (University of Glasgow)   Providing an interpreter addresses individuals’ access to justice rights, and it also promotes accountable decisions, based on appropriately translated information.[i]  But interpreting in justice settings is not straightforward, and digitalisation adds … Continue reading

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme   Joe Tomlinson     In the fraught context of Brexit, the need to register EU citizens already resident in the UK presented a major conundrum of policy, law, and administration. The answer that has been offered by the government is the … Continue reading

“Hello Dungavel!”: observations on the use of video link technology in immigration bail hearings

“Hello Dungavel!”: observations on the use of video link technology in immigration bail hearings   By Jo Hynes   Immigration bail hearings are by nature unspectacular. They are short, take place in chaotic hearing centres, and have fewer immediate consequences than other hearings in the First Tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber). Still, they offer … Continue reading