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Immigration and asylum

This category contains 65 posts

Pay to prove that you are a child: the government consults on fees for age assessment appeals to the Immigration and Asylum Chambers

By Jonathan Collinson (University of Huddersfield) The government has launched a consultation on the fees payable by applicants who lodge certain kinds of appeals in the Immigration and Asylum Chambers (IAC): the administrative tribunals responsible for hearing appeals against decisions of the Home Office in immigration and asylum matters. The consultation proposes fees – payable … Continue reading

Experiments in Automating Immigration Systems

Experiments in Automating Immigration Systems By Tatiana Kazim, Public Law Project and Equal Education Law Centre (South Africa) Governments around the world are embracing automated decision making (ADM). The potential benefits are well-rehearsed: faster, cheaper, more accurate, more consistent decision-making. Equally, the dangers posed by government ADM systems have been exposed by several high-profile scandals … Continue reading

Immigration complaints (Part II)

Immigration complaints (part 2) By Robert Thomas (University of Manchester Law School) This is the second of three blogs on immigration complaints. This first blog examined the key trends, features, and criticisms of immigration complaints. This blog looks at the outcomes of immigration complaints and discusses the importance of government collecting data on complaint outcomes. … Continue reading

Immigration complaints (Part I)

Immigration complaints (Part I) By Robert Thomas (University of Manchester) This is the first of three blogs that consider immigration complaints, an important topic of administrative justice. This first blog will examine the key trends, features, and criticisms of immigration complaints. The second blog will examine complaint outcomes and the importance of government collecting data … Continue reading

Out of the frying pan…? Legal action research into EEA nationals’ access to welfare support during the transition and beyond.

Out of the frying pan…? Legal action research into EEA nationals’ access to welfare support during the transition and beyond Charlotte O’Brien and Alice Welsh (University of York) Even before the referendum, EEA nationals and their family members faced a host of complex legal and administrative obstacles accessing their welfare rights. As we near the … Continue reading