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UKAJI

UKAJI has written 220 posts for UKAJI

What’s new in administrative justice, November 2017

Parliament The EU (Withdrawal) Bill has begun its Committee stage in the House of Commons. The government has given assurances that parliament will be given a vote on whether or not to accept the deal agreed upon. However, in the event that parliament does not approve the deal, the UK will exit the EU nonetheless. … Continue reading

Mandatory reconsideration: Inadequate by design

By Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson In September 2017, the Work and Pensions Committee launched an inquiry into how the assessment processes for Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Personal Independence Payments (PIP) are handled by Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) contractors ATOS, Capita and Maximus, and how the application, assessment and appeals processes for … Continue reading

Live research projects – latest update November 2017!

As part of our work to develop a network of researchers working in administrative justice, today we launch an updated version of the UKAJI Live Research Projects database, alongside a number of new profiles of projects listed in the database.  An organic resource The register is an organic resource, and we are well aware that work … Continue reading

A legal threat to ombuds’ practice

By Gavin McBurnie On the 7th and 8th November, the Court of Appeal heard an appeal by two GPs against the findings and recommendations of the Parliamentary and Health Services Ombudsman (PHSO) (Miller & Howarth v PHSO). This post examines the potential implications of the case and refers back to the recent UK Supreme Court … Continue reading

Revisiting the turn to ‘users’ in administrative justice

By Joe Tomlinson In this post, Joe Tomlinson explores critiques of the current focus on ‘users’ of administrative justice and suggests that grasping the multiple conflicting understandings of ‘user’ can help to clarify the underlying concerns about user-focused design. In UK administrative justice circles, it would be easy to get the impression that we are … Continue reading