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UKAJI

UKAJI has written 252 posts for UKAJI

Design and implementation of a high-quality probability sample: Lessons learnt

Originally posted on lucindaplatt:
Migration research is one of the most rapidly developing fields of demography in Europe. To develop an empirically-based theoretical understanding of immigration we need high-quality representative data. However, surveys of immigrants often are confronted with challenges of coverage, representativeness and response rates and cannot face the high costs needed to overcome…

New Report: The Digitalisation of Tribunals

Tribunals are a major part of the administrative justice system. The Government has begun to introduce digital procedures in tribunals but the full details of the changes remain to be seen. This report—commissioned by the UK Administrative Justice Institute—outlines ‘what we know and what we need to know’ about the digitalisation of tribunals. It takes … Continue reading

Courts challenge ombud’s approach to determining service failure

UKAJI is publishing a series of blog posts about the Court of Appeal decision in Miller v Health Service Commissioner [2018] EWCA Civ 144 (February 2018), which identified a number of failures in the investigation by the Health Service Ombudsman for England. The first post, by Richard Kirkham, considered what the judgment tells us about judicial approaches to … Continue reading

A reflection on the participation of decision-makers in administrative justice research

By Michelle Waite Decisions made by those working in administrative justice systems are often in the news, especially in the context of sickness and disability benefits. In a recent Twitter exchange I expressed the view that in order to fully understand any administrative justice system it is essential that decision-makers are included in administrative justice … Continue reading

Mapping the Bodies involved in Health Redress in the United Kingdom

UKAJI has commissioned this research to explain the UK health systems and map the bodies involved in health redress in order to provide a resource for researchers who want to study aspects of the system, including regulators and ombuds. It is hoped that it may also contribute to the identification and discussion of pressure points … Continue reading