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UKAJI

UKAJI has written 278 posts for UKAJI

UKAJI administrative justice research database

By Lee Marsons Today, I am delighted to publish on behalf of UKAJI the first step in establishing a public database of research related to administrative justice in the United Kingdom. Currently, the database contains around two hundred documents, ranging from books and journal articles, to governmental and third sector reports and House of Commons … Continue reading

Workshop on Improving Participation in Court of Protection Proceedings

By Jaime Lindsey Meaningful access to justice requires having the ability to participate in decision-making that will directly affect you. Yet analysis of participation in mental capacity law is relatively under-researched compared to other areas of law. This ESRC-funded workshop on ‘Improving participation in Court of Protection proceedings’ allowed those with an interest in participation … Continue reading

Book Review: Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life

By Dr Zach Richards In this blog post, Zach Richards reviews a new book by Marc Hertogh, Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life (2018, Palgrave Socio-Legal Studies). Marc Hertogh’s recent book Nobody’s Law makes a valuable contribution to socio-legal studies of administrative justice. The clear, well-written text published in the Palgrave MacMillan … Continue reading

Book review: Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment? Benefit Sanctions in the UK

By Brian Thompson In this blog post, Brian Thompson reviews a new book by Michael Adler, Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment? Benefit Sanctions in the UK (2018, Palgrave Socio-Legal Studies). Michael Adler explains that the project of this book is to give a critical account of the benefit sanctions regime in the UK and to … Continue reading

Re-imagining public-sector complaint systems

  By Chris Gill Public-sector complaint systems often do not meet the needs of those who use them, those who operate them, and others who have a stake in them.[1] They can be hard to access, they can be costly, and their broader public value is rarely demonstrated. At the same time, the theoretical potential … Continue reading