//
archives

Department for Work and Pensions

This tag is associated with 19 posts

Mandatory reconsideration: Inadequate by design

By Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson In September 2017, the Work and Pensions Committee launched an inquiry into how the assessment processes for Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Personal Independence Payments (PIP) are handled by Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) contractors ATOS, Capita and Maximus, and how the application, assessment and appeals processes for … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, September 2016

Parliament The Joint Committee on Human Rights has published a report on the Government’s proposals for a Counter-Extremism Bill. The Committee cautioned against introducing further legislation in this area, suggesting that the Government should instead use the existing extensive legal framework for dealing with people who promote violence. Advocate General Saugmansagard Øe of the Court … Continue reading

Report shines a spotlight on initial decision-making and Mandatory Reconsideration

Every year the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) makes 12 million decisions on social security benefits. As the Social Security Advisory Committee (SSAC) notes in a recent report, with such volumes it’s not surprising if mistakes are made. Only a small proportion of these decisions are challenged by claimants, but the processes for review … Continue reading

Mandatory reconsideration: what do the latest stats tell us?

By Robert Thomas Readers of this blog will be well-aware of mandatory reconsideration (MR) and the discussion surrounding it. More than half a million MR decisions have been made since the introduction of MR in 2013, making this one of the largest areas of administrative decision-making. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) recently published … Continue reading

Seminar on initial decision-making, internal review and administrative justice

Mandatory reconsideration is something of a hybrid feature of administrative justice. In terms of design, this is obvious. It is a form of redress in one sense, but it is also a form of primary decision-making in another. By Robert Thomas and Joseph Tomlinson, School of Law, University of Manchester We recently held a joint UKAJI/University … Continue reading