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Legal consciousness

This tag is associated with 5 posts

Book Review: Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life

By Dr Zach Richards In this blog post, Zach Richards reviews a new book by Marc Hertogh, Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life (2018, Palgrave Socio-Legal Studies). Marc Hertogh’s recent book Nobody’s Law makes a valuable contribution to socio-legal studies of administrative justice. The clear, well-written text published in the Palgrave MacMillan … Continue reading

New publications explore benefits sanctions and legal consciousness

Two books of interest to the administrative justice community have recently been published. Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment by Michael Adler subjects benefit sanctions in the UK to a critique from the perspective of administrative justice. Nobody’s Law: Legal Consciousness and Legal Alienation in Everyday Life by Marc Hertogh examines legal consciousness and, through empirical … Continue reading

Book review: Ombudsmen and ADR: A Comparative Study of Informal Justice in Europe

By Nick O’Brien Nick O’Brien reviews a new book by Naomi Creutzfeldt on her study exploring national differences in complainants’ levels of trust in ombuds. In her timely new book, Ombudsmen and ADR: A Comparative Study of Informal Justice in Europe, Naomi Creutzfeldt (University of Westminster) shows that ‘the relationships people have with the informal … Continue reading

Live research projects – latest update November 2017!

As part of our work to develop a network of researchers working in administrative justice, today we launch an updated version of the UKAJI Live Research Projects database, alongside a number of new profiles of projects listed in the database.  An organic resource The register is an organic resource, and we are well aware that work … Continue reading

New research: Kafkaesque and demoralising: how online critics perceive the UK’s public service ombuds

This post gives an overview of a recent study of ‘ombuds watchers’ and their online criticism of the public service ombud schemes, including the PHSO, LGO and SPSO. The researchers, Chris Gill (University of Glasgow) and Naomi Creutzfeldt (University of Westminster), have published a paper about the research: ‘The ‘Ombuds Watchers’: Collective Dissent and Legal … Continue reading