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Appeals, Complaints, Courts, Ombuds and reviewers, System design, Tribunals

Keeping the administrative justice system under review

Martin Partington writes here of the daunting prospect of trying to maintain robust oversight of the administrative justice landscape.

Martin Partington: Spotlight on the Justice System

When the first major step was taken in the creation of what we would today recognise as a modern administrative justice system – the passing of the Tribunals and Inquiries Act 1958 – the Government of the day decided to create a statutory body – the Council on Tribunals – to keep the work of tribunals under review.

It was a body whose influence waxed and waned over subsequent years, but its reports were influential, particularly in promoting the need for training of tribunal personnel, ensuring that procedures would enable unrepresented parties to have the chance to be heard.

The Leggatt Review of Tribunals (of which I was a member) started with the view that the time had come to abolish the Council – but during discussion, it changed its mind, not least because of the powerful advocacy of its then Chair, the late Lord Tony Newton. Leggatt ended up…

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