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Initial decision-making

This category contains 33 posts

Young people’s participation in SEND dispute resolution: A Place at the Table roundtable discussion

This blog post summarises a recent roundtable discussion that sheds light on an aspect of administrative justice in action in everyday life: the participation of young people in resolving disputes with local authorities about their special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) support needs. The full report of the roundtable discussion is available to download here and for viewing … Continue reading

Responsive legality: The new administrative justice

A new publication, Responsive Legality: The new administrative justice by Dr Zach Richards (Keele University), explores the legal and moral values underpinning public decision-making in the 21st century. Zach is the winner of the UKAJI New Voices award, presented at the New Voices in Administrative Justice workshop at the University of Sheffield in September 2017. Responsive Legality is an … Continue reading

Joint Committee on Human Rights highlights systemic failure in its report on Windrush detention

  Today the UK Parliament’s Joint Committee on Human Rights publishes a damning report on the Home Office’s treatment of two members of the Windrush generation who were wrongfully detained and whose cases reflect, in the views of the Committee, what was ‘in all likelihood a systemic failure’. By Margaret Doyle The Joint Committee on … Continue reading

Universal Credit – When evidence becomes politicised

In our Research Roadmap published in February of this year, UKAJI cited the roll-out of Universal Credit (UC) as an example of the extraordinary impact of administrative justice on the day-to-day lives of people. In this blog post, we consider the recent report by the National Audit Office (NAO) on its independent review of UC, … Continue reading

Windrush – what are the administrative justice dimensions?

‘You would be surprised how often the just society, the good life, human happiness, call it what you will, is pushed out of our reach, not by the malevolence of some people, usually referred to as ” they,” who are consciously depriving us of it, or by the inertia of those to whom we entrust … Continue reading