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Tribunals

This category contains 82 posts

Victims and the Mental Health Tribunal

VICTIMS AND THE MENTAL HEALTH TRIBUNAL By Julian Hendy (Hundred Families)   The Mental Health Tribunal, or, more formally, the mental health jurisdiction of the First-tier Tribunal considers the release of psychiatric patients detained under the mental health act.   Most will have been detained to ensure they receive urgent treatment following a deterioration in … Continue reading

Researching mental capacity disputes: The role of mediation in improving participation in the Court of Protection

Researching mental capacity disputes: The role of mediation in improving participation in the Court of Protection   By Jaime Lindsey (University of Essex)   It is important that people are involved in decisions which directly affect their lives. Research has shown many benefits of participation in decision-making processes ranging from improving the quality of the … Continue reading

Reform of the administrative justice system: a plea for change and a research agenda

Reform of the administrative justice system: a plea for change and a research agenda   By Richard Kirkham (University of Sheffield) (L) and Naomi Creutzfeldt (University of Westminster) (R)       This post is a response to recent overlapping speeches given by the Senior President of Tribunals (SPT), Sir Ernest Ryder, with a particular … Continue reading

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.

Lowering or raising the language barrier? Reflections on interpretation, translation and the digitalisation of immigration tribunals.   By Sarah Craig (University of Glasgow)   Providing an interpreter addresses individuals’ access to justice rights, and it also promotes accountable decisions, based on appropriately translated information.[i]  But interpreting in justice settings is not straightforward, and digitalisation adds … Continue reading

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme

Quick and uneasy justice: an administrative justice analysis of the EU Settlement Scheme   Joe Tomlinson     In the fraught context of Brexit, the need to register EU citizens already resident in the UK presented a major conundrum of policy, law, and administration. The answer that has been offered by the government is the … Continue reading