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Northern Ireland

This category contains 14 posts

What’s new in administrative justice, October 2016

Parliament The Public Accounts Committee has published a report on the Ministry of Justice’s reforms to the probation system, aimed at reducing reoffending. The report expressed concerns about a lack of progress with the reforms. The new Secretary of State for Justice Liz Truss has given evidence to the Justice Committee. She confirmed that the … Continue reading

Conference announcement – Litigating for social change

Litigating for Social Change Wednesday 19 – Friday 21 October 2016 Belfast, Northern Ireland This international conference will bring together NGOs, community activists, litigators, academics and funders to reflect on how strategic litigation can transform lives and enable people and communities to realise their rights. The conference will explore: lessons learnt to date how strategic … Continue reading

The implications of JR55 for administrative justice

  By Richard Kirkham and Brian Thompson Introduction The case of JR55 was the first occasion in which a decision of a public services ombudsman scheme in the UK had been heard in the Supreme Court. Unfortunately for the ombudsman sector, it did not go well. This post does not offer a full analysis of the … Continue reading

Ombuds and national human rights institutions: Still learning to speak the same language?

By Dr Nick O’Brien, Honorary Research Fellow, University of Liverpool Some reflections on an international conference in Belfast, 26-27 May 2016, on Human Rights: A 21st Century Approach to the Work of Ombudsmen The ombuds institution in the UK, ever since its reception in 1967, has been associated chiefly, in its public-sector form at least, … Continue reading

What’s new in administrative justice, February 2016

Parliament The Government have published a new Policing and Crime Bill. The Bill would make changes in relation to police complaints procedures and collaboration between the emergency services, among many other things. The EU Justice Sub-Committee has heard evidence from Justice Secretary Michael Gove and leading academics in relation to its inquiry on the impact … Continue reading